never need to bleed the brakes...

Old 05-11-2011, 08:16 AM
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never need to bleed the brakes...

...under normal driving conditions

accordign to stoptech (brake manufacturer), you only need to replace the brake fluid and never need to bleed the brakes under normal driving conditions. if you autocross or track, then its a different story.
well, ill be damned! this will save me hella time and money. is this true?

http://www.stoptech.com/tech_info/wp...edbrakes.shtml
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Old 05-11-2011, 08:42 AM
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Originally Posted by two faced rat bastard View Post
...under normal driving conditions

accordign to stoptech (brake manufacturer), you only need to replace the brake fluid and never need to bleed the brakes under normal driving conditions. if you autocross or track, then its a different story.
well, ill be damned! this will save me hella time and money. is this true?

http://www.stoptech.com/tech_info/wp...edbrakes.shtml
stoptech said no such thing. in fact:
Because brake fluid will absorb moisture through the brake system's hoses and reservoir, evaluation of the wet boiling point is employed to test the performance of used brake fluid and the degradation in it's performance.
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Old 05-11-2011, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by turbosix View Post
stoptech said no such thing. in fact:
they said it here, near the bottom:

In closing, here are a few rules of thumb to help you to determine the proper bleeding interval for your particular application:
1. Under normal operating conditions, and without brake system modifications, typical OEM braking systems have been designed to NOT require bleeding for the life of the vehicle unless the system is opened for repair or replacement. If you're just driving around town or on the highway to work, there is really no need to bleed! There are a few European vehicles which do recommend replacement on a semi-regular basis for other reasons though, so be sure to check in your owner's manual or at your service center for your particular application.
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Old 05-11-2011, 10:30 AM
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TOUCHE. for some reason the whole page didnt load, didnt see that.

the issue is that the fluid can and will absorb moisture. which can lead to rust on the inside surfaces of the brake lines.

i would imagine most autos are going to suggest bleeding the brakes at some interval in the service manual.
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Old 05-11-2011, 10:34 AM
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correct me if im wrong, but my theory is that, if you suck the old stuff from the resevoir and not bleed the brakes, you are still replacing the brake fluid faster than it can accumulate moisture. the fresh brake fluid will mix with the old in the line anyway. so every 2-3 years from the resevoir will ensure that the moistures is low enough (2-3%) to not cause any harm. any thoughts?
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Old 05-11-2011, 10:35 AM
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looking at the service manual, i'm seeing replace brake fluid every 3 years or 45,000mi.

so there you go.
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Old 05-11-2011, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by two faced rat bastard View Post
correct me if im wrong, but my theory is that, if you suck the old stuff from the resevoir and not bleed the brakes, you are still replacing the brake fluid faster than it can accumulate moisture. the fresh brake fluid will mix with the old in the line anyway. so every 2-3 years from the resevoir will ensure that the moistures is low enough (2-3%) to not cause any harm. any thoughts?
the problem with that, is you've got fresh fluid in the reservoir. i dont know how the fluid all the way down to where we go from hard steel line, to rubber line by the suspension that connects to the caliper, and in the caliper at self, will ever "return" to the reservoir.

if you're just sucking the reservoir dry and refilling it, you've still got all that cruddy stuff at the very end of the system.

if you're cracking open the bleeders when you compress the caliper, you're going to at least evacuate 99% of the fluid in the caliper, so that helps, vs. not cracking the bleeder and back-flushing all the nasty crap back up into the system.
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Old 05-11-2011, 10:55 AM
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Go with the Motul 5.1 synthetic brake fluid, it surpasses DOT 3 & 4. type.
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Old 05-11-2011, 11:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Vanishing Point View Post
Go with the Motul 5.1 synthetic brake fluid, it surpasses DOT 3 & 4. type.
honestly, for DD, DOT5 is terrible. sure, it has a higher boiling temp. but it absorbs moisture at a much faster rate, and needs to be replaced at least once a year.
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Old 05-11-2011, 11:27 AM
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i have ATE super blue in my veins right now. the pennzoil (or whatever) fluid that i put in when i flushed my brakes before the 1st trackday i did was TOAST after 2 trackdays. super mushy pedal. f'n thing sucked.
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Old 05-11-2011, 02:15 PM
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Originally Posted by two faced rat bastard View Post
honestly, for DD, DOT5 is terrible. sure, it has a higher boiling temp. but it absorbs moisture at a much faster rate, and needs to be replaced at least once a year.
Actually that is incorrect, the advantage of a pure silicone fluid is that it doesn't absorb moisture like a glycol based product. And as far as when to change I would follow Honda's recommendation even using the Motul.
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Old 05-11-2011, 02:41 PM
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I was under the impression that dot5 and 5+ is uber ultra dry.
also air exposed brake fluid has limited shelf life/longevity especially if it sits all winter.
another affector is how quick your brakes heat up, it can burn the fluid turning it black also extra contraction and expansion of the hoses can progress the tarnishing as well as deteriorate the rubber lines.
personnaly I flushed my brake fluid last summer drove 4-5000km's and it is now dark as sh#t.
o yeah just changing the fluid in the res. wont really do anything but give a false sense of security if you want consider it an overflow reservoir as it wont mix well with whats already pressurised in the system.
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