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oil again

Old 09-19-2004, 10:12 PM
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oil again

I am just wondering, will changing oil brand damage the engine? or doesn't matter?
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Old 09-21-2004, 01:20 AM
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As far as i know regular motor oil are all the same as long as they meet two requirement. 1st- SAE Approval -ex. 10w-40, 5w-30 and so on. They make sure that the rate of flow which indicate on the oil is correct. 2nd- API Service of (SL) this indicate right kind of additive are included in your motor oil. Make sure it say SL anything before that are old oil which should be void such as SJ, SA, SB .... So as long as the regular oil brand you buy meet these two requirement it good to go. SAE are indicate in the front and API are in the back. So changing brand should not damage your car at all, but for Synthetic I'm not sure. I doubt it would, i just don't know. Any ? just replie back.
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Old 09-21-2004, 01:57 AM
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what do you mean by Synthetic?
and what brand is the better?

thx
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Old 09-21-2004, 04:55 PM
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any oil brand will be find as long as they meet the two requirement above. Unless you're one off those where i gotta get the most expensive brand otherwise i can't go to sleep at night then so be it, but you just wasting your money. It not the brand it the price you should be worried about. But if they're Synthethic then it different DON'T YOU KNOW WHAT SYNTHETHIC IS?
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Old 10-05-2004, 02:40 AM
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Synthetics are different, they are not petroleum related, they are built in a laboratory by chemists and as a consequence, they are the ultimate lubricant.

The article below explains why every can on the shelf labelled synthetic is not!

A word of caution – You get what you pay for!

Below is an article written by John Rowland, Silkolene/Fuchs Chief R & D Chemist for 40 years.

Quote:

Costs of synthetics vary considerably. The most expensive are the “Ester” types originally only used in jet engines. These cost 6 to 10 times more than high quality mineral oils.

The cheapest synthetics are not really synthetic at all, from a chemists point of view. These are in fact specially refined light viscosity mineral oils known as “hydrocracked”. These have some advantages over equivalent mineral oils, particularly in lower viscosity motor oils such as 5w-30 or other oils with a low “W” rating such as 5w-50 etc and they cost about 1.5 times more than good quality mineral fractions.

We use several different grades of this base oil, where appropriate. This is the “synthetic” which is always used in cheap oils that are labelled “synthetic”. Yes it’s a cruel world, you get what you pay for!

Now, you may ask, why are these special mineral oils called “synthetic”?

Well, it was all sorted in a legal battle that took place in the USA about ten years ago. Sound reasons (including evidence from a Nobel Prize winning chemist) were disregarded and the final ruling was that certain mineral bases that had undergone extra chemical treatments could be called “synthetic”.

Needless to say, the marketing executives wet their knickers with pure delight! They realised that this meant, and still does, that the critical buzz-word “synthetic” could be printed on a can of cheap oil provided that the contents included a few percent of “hydrocracked” mineral oil, at a cost of quite literally a few pence.

So, the chemistry of “synthetics” is complex and so is the politics!

The economics are very simple. If you like the look of a smart well-marketed can with “synthetic” printed on it, fair enough, it will not cost you a lot; and now you know why this is the case. But, if you drive a high performance car, and you intend to keep it for several years, and maybe do the odd “track day”, then you need a genuine Ester/PAO (Poly Alpha Olefin) synthetic oil.

This oil costs more money to buy, because it costs us a lot of money to make, very simply, you always get what you pay for!

Hope this helps to explain.

Cheers
Simon
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Old 02-28-2008, 02:06 PM
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Ok

Originally Posted by wowowox View Post
I am just wondering, will changing oil brand damage the engine? or doesn't matter?
I tend to agree mostly but im still not sure I understand everything here
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Old 02-29-2008, 09:06 AM
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Just to be clear, can someone list the true full synthetics that are available in the US market?

I have heard that Castrol (their synthetic is Syntec?) is one of the few companies that refines its own oils, rather than buying from (I assume) companies that wholesale it. Likewise, the Swiss company Motorex and the Japanese company Eneos (?).

Is Mobil 1 a true synthetic?



Originally Posted by oilman View Post
Synthetics are different, they are not petroleum related, they are built in a laboratory by chemists and as a consequence, they are the ultimate lubricant.

The article below explains why every can on the shelf labelled synthetic is not!

A word of caution – You get what you pay for!

Below is an article written by John Rowland, Silkolene/Fuchs Chief R & D Chemist for 40 years.

Quote:

Costs of synthetics vary considerably. The most expensive are the “Ester” types originally only used in jet engines. These cost 6 to 10 times more than high quality mineral oils.

The cheapest synthetics are not really synthetic at all, from a chemists point of view. These are in fact specially refined light viscosity mineral oils known as “hydrocracked”. These have some advantages over equivalent mineral oils, particularly in lower viscosity motor oils such as 5w-30 or other oils with a low “W” rating such as 5w-50 etc and they cost about 1.5 times more than good quality mineral fractions.

We use several different grades of this base oil, where appropriate. This is the “synthetic” which is always used in cheap oils that are labelled “synthetic”. Yes it’s a cruel world, you get what you pay for!

Now, you may ask, why are these special mineral oils called “synthetic”?

Well, it was all sorted in a legal battle that took place in the USA about ten years ago. Sound reasons (including evidence from a Nobel Prize winning chemist) were disregarded and the final ruling was that certain mineral bases that had undergone extra chemical treatments could be called “synthetic”.

Needless to say, the marketing executives wet their knickers with pure delight! They realised that this meant, and still does, that the critical buzz-word “synthetic” could be printed on a can of cheap oil provided that the contents included a few percent of “hydrocracked” mineral oil, at a cost of quite literally a few pence.

So, the chemistry of “synthetics” is complex and so is the politics!

The economics are very simple. If you like the look of a smart well-marketed can with “synthetic” printed on it, fair enough, it will not cost you a lot; and now you know why this is the case. But, if you drive a high performance car, and you intend to keep it for several years, and maybe do the odd “track day”, then you need a genuine Ester/PAO (Poly Alpha Olefin) synthetic oil.

This oil costs more money to buy, because it costs us a lot of money to make, very simply, you always get what you pay for!

Hope this helps to explain.

Cheers
Simon
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Old 02-29-2008, 10:28 AM
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I use Mobil1 and have no complaints. I have used Pennsoil and Quacker State in the past and they worked well also.
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Old 05-29-2008, 07:49 AM
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I owned an AP1 of year 1999 manufactured. I use it in Hong Kong with temperature
around 25-30'C. What kind of engine oil should I use best? Also what kind of gear oil
is good for my gear box? Thanks.

I am using 5W30 engine oil manufactured by Motul 300V. I find out that my Defi meter reach 20 or below with red light on. It indicates that the oil presure is a little
it low when I start the engine. When the car runs for 15 minutes, the oil presure meter read to 40. Is it o.k. with the car? Or should I change the engine oil to
10w40.

Please reply me. Thanks.
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Old 05-29-2008, 01:21 PM
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Refer to your manual for all the manufacturers recomendations
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