Simple maintenance - Page 2 - S2000 Forums

All Other Honda S2000 Related Discussions Share your knowledge, experience and info about Honda S2000

Simple maintenance

Old 02-12-2008, 09:48 AM
  #41  
Sentient Being
 
Pablo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: LI, NY
Posts: 684
THANKS "D"

Regards
Pablo
Pablo is offline  
Old 02-12-2008, 06:12 PM
  #42  
"Enjoy the drive"
 
gomarlins3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Kuna Idaho
Posts: 5,292
Yes folks, change your cabin filter from time to time. If not, it may start to look like this:
gomarlins3 is offline  
Old 02-12-2008, 07:55 PM
  #43  
Sentient Being
 
Pablo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: LI, NY
Posts: 684
G man does it tell ya in the manual where the cabin filter is and how to change it? If not, would you be so kind as to enlighten us. I figure it may be more difficult to find than the secret compartment. Thanks

Best Regards
Pablo
Pablo is offline  
Old 02-12-2008, 08:51 PM
  #44  
Site Owner
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 887
If you don't have the service manual, heres a link to the 00-03 service manual. I think it should be the same for AP2s for the cabin filter.

http://downloads.hondatech.info/Auto...e%20Manual.zip

The first page looks like it came from a **** mag. Other than that, it goes to the service manual. It'll tell you just about everything about your car. The dust and pollen cabin filter instructions are on page 21-42
D1sclaimer is offline  
Old 02-13-2008, 08:11 AM
  #45  
Sentient Being
 
Pablo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: LI, NY
Posts: 684
D Man, you are the BEST! While I was on the site, I down loaded the manual for my Acura TL also. Thanks Buddy!
Pablo is offline  
Old 01-02-2016, 07:16 PM
  #46  
Got S2000?
 
Jim21680's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 1,967
Nice old thread to resurrect. While doing some "simple maintenance" to my 90,000-mile 2008 earlier today (just an oil change)...I started to wonder about some "not-so-simple" stuff I'd probably be doing fairly soon. Mainly, a coolant flush...but why the heck wouldn't I replace the upper & lower hoses while I'm at it? There is no better time to do it, right?

Heck, I might even drop in a new radiator & thermostat while I'm at it. The point is, I see no reason to swap this fluid out more than once in the next 100,000 miles. (And hell yes, I plan to keep my S2000 that long if the automotive gods allow it).

For what is probably the first time ever, my eyes traced the routes of the two hoses, and GOOD GRIEF...that is some tight engine bay real estate. Maybe it's better from under the car, but it didn't seem too promising. Oh well, I'll gladly put that job back on the shelf for another day, but it is definitely, absolutely, positively nothing to look forward to.

Last edited by Jim21680; 01-03-2016 at 03:23 PM.
Jim21680 is offline  
Old 01-03-2016, 09:41 AM
  #47  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Vero beach, Fl
Posts: 694
It is amazing how the engine bay opens up when you pull the stock airbox out, all of a sudden you have real estate in there.
I replaced my stock box with a modified stock box and was shocked at how open the bay was when I had it out.
cdk456 is offline  
Old 01-04-2016, 07:08 AM
  #48  
2009 Rio Yellow/A7E/A330
 
cosmomiller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Foothills, Sierra Nevada, CA
Posts: 1,458
With a 2008 you can go a bit longer with the coolant change. I would follow Billman's flush DIY at the other forum.
I am not sure why you would change out the radiator / thermostat if you have no issues.
Much more importantly, have you adjusted the valves? That is the big deal for DBW cars. I did my 09's valves at < 50K and sure enough, the exhaust were very tight.
I also pre-emptivly changed my TCT (no noise) for a Billman TCT. Very easy.
cosmomiller is offline  
Old 01-04-2016, 09:53 AM
  #49  
Got S2000?
 
Jim21680's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 1,967
I did do the valves, around 82,000. Plugs too at that point.
That was an easier job than I expected, in regards to getting everything disassembled and back together again. I wont hesitate to do it again, maybe around 120-130k. (And the job will probably take half the amount of time).

The reason I was thinking about the radiator and thermostat was purely preventative maintenance. I have my doubts about the radiator lasting to 150k, but maybe others are getting that lifespan out of them.

The good/bad thing is, I'm lucky to put 5k a year on my car these days (taking the train to work has greatly reduced my annual mileage)...it was about 45 miles a day. The coolant is already 6 years old, so I'm not really sure as to what condition it's in. It's still blue, and no leaks, but that's it.
Jim21680 is offline  
Old 01-05-2016, 09:31 AM
  #50  
2009 Rio Yellow/A7E/A330
 
cosmomiller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Foothills, Sierra Nevada, CA
Posts: 1,458
From what I have heard from others (this car and others) the long life coolant (especially Honda/Acura) has a stellar record as long as it is not contaminated. Very different than my Fords with Prestone type of coolant. The only issue I have heard on radiator failure, for Honda, is the non-tow package Pilot/MDX models that have the trans cooler inside of the radiator. Some hardware is dissimilar metal that leads to corrosion that leads to mixing of transmission fluid with the radiator coolant that leads to transmission failure on a dark road teeming with jacked up gang members when you realize you left your Glock and mobile phone at home. The tow package (that is me thank goodness!) has a separate trans cooler from the radiator.

If you drain and fill your coolant on schedule and see that it looks okay, I would not mess with a new radiator unless you like the look of stainless. A few threads I have seen with very high milage Ss have never mentioned radiator issues.
cosmomiller is offline  
Old 01-05-2016, 12:27 PM
  #51  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Vero beach, Fl
Posts: 694
The only problems I have heard off associated with a coolant flush and change is entrapped air in the cooling system. I changed mine out a few years ago, doing nothing special, and had no issues to speak of. I did install a flush valve on it to forcibly flush the block but nothing else. However, on the other S2000 site there are some horror stories about the extreme measures need to get rid of trapped air pockets.
cdk456 is offline  
Old 01-05-2016, 07:29 PM
  #52  
Got S2000?
 
Jim21680's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 1,967
Alright...you've all convinced me. At 100k, I'll partially flush the coolant (maybe just drain the radiator & reservoir, refilling with new stuff)...and I'll leave the radiator, hoses, and thermostat to live out their normal lives...with regular inspections of course. Given the simplicity and relatively cheap cost, I'll probably replace the belt around 100-110k.

Thanks for your opinions fellas...this forum's still a great place after all these years.
Jim21680 is offline  
Old 01-05-2016, 08:44 PM
  #53  
2009 Rio Yellow/A7E/A330
 
cosmomiller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Foothills, Sierra Nevada, CA
Posts: 1,458
I ripped this off another DIY. Billman gets the credit. It seems as if you drain a little and the level drops enough, you might as well do the entire enchilada as air has been introduced. The term "flush" is used loosely as the coolant should not be forced out with water unless it is distilled water but with clean fluid like yours should be, there is no need at all.

At the bottom I have listed a funnel many swear by but I have never actually used myself.


FIRST THING TO KNOW: Do not drive the car down the road until the interior heat is good and HOT. If you do, you will overheat the engine. This engine can go many miles with air in the cooling system, then suddenly overheat. One good overheat is all it takes to destroy the engine or the head gasket.

On the same token, if your heat is EVER less than hot, you have a leak!

It will help greatly to do this procedure in an extremely quiet area. You will be listening for a small hiss off air from the bleeder and it can be hard to hear if it's not quiet.

Keep the car in a local loop (one block from shop) while working on coolant-air and MONITOR THE HEAT! If the heat suddenly gets less than hot, return to shop immediately and work the air out.

Park car with nose elevated slightly (as long as nose is not going downhill you will be ok)

Fill the radiator slowly with the front bleeder open, don't even bother with the one on the firewall. It does not work as intended.

I highly recommend straight Honda TypeII blue coolant directly from Honda. I have seen this coolant go 12 years and remain 100% spotless.

Replace radiator cap. Close bleeder.

Initial start on cold engine: Turn heat on high..... Temp dial to full hot, mode dial to face vents, fan on high. Start car, idle to operating temp (3 bars on ap1) or hold at 2500 rpm to speed process. After the initial warm up, car will be run in 2 minute intervals until heat is hot. No more.

1: TURN CAR OFF.

2: Open bleeder a very small amount, slowly....just enough to hear the air hissing out.
let it sit until all hissing stops, 5-30 seconds.

3: Once hissing stops, squeeze the upper radiator hose completely flat with your hand covered with a rag, addition hissing/air will come out. Hold it flat until all hissing has stopped. Close bleeder WHILE HOSE IS SQUEEZED. Then release hose.

4: Open radiator cap, fill to top. Replace cap.

Run car another 2 minutes at 2500 rpm while monitoring heat out of the vents.

If you don't have hot heat in 2 minutes, shut it off/repeat steps 1-4 until heat coming out of the vents turns sharply hot...not warm air. You'll know it's hot when the temp changes sharply and is close to burning your fingers.

Once the heat turns hot, repeat steps 1-4 one last time(last radiator top-up). You are now safe to drive the car.

The key here is never open the bleeder with the car running. If you read carefully you will see at no point do you do so. All that will do is waste coolant, and stop you from getting the air out.

Last step:

Fill the overflow tank about 1/2" over the full line. It will make up for the tiny bits of air that will work itself out by morning.

More comments:

An air bound engine gets hot real fast. Blowing air through a 80 percent empty core has little if no affect on warm up speed.

By running the fan on high, it is very easy to feel the change in temp because it over cools the trickle of coolant in the line and air temp stays cold.

Once all the air is out, the high fan will not overcome it and it turns hot very fast.

Fan on high does not effect the outcome per say, but it makes a big difference when conveying a diy.

With the fan on low, the trickle of coolant will be enough to get hot and provide a false sense of hot heat.

Heat on high is the safest way to feel the heat go from lukewarm to red hot.

Amazon.com: Lisle 24610 Spill-Free Funnel: Automotive Amazon.com: Lisle 24610 Spill-Free Funnel: Automotive

Last edited by cosmomiller; 01-05-2016 at 08:49 PM.
cosmomiller is offline  
Old 01-06-2016, 09:10 AM
  #54  
Senior Member
 
phins2rt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 1,284
^^Excellent Cosmo! I will probably need to tackle this in the spring! Thanks!
phins2rt is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
RMurphy
Off-Topic
15
11-13-2012 12:47 AM
Doug3
Off-Topic
4
07-23-2011 11:57 AM
kellyinok
Interior / Audio / Electronics
19
05-29-2008 06:43 PM
StemS2k
New s2000.com Member Area / Introductions
17
12-26-2006 09:40 PM
TripleChris
All Other Honda S2000 Related Discussions
1
09-01-2004 06:25 PM


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: Simple maintenance


Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

© 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.